Same-Sex Unions in Premodern Europe

Its FREE to signup, browse and message.

See a Problem?










Yes, I agree to the terms & conditions and privacy policy

SSL certificate Comodo secured site




Account Options

Sofiya-Grad girl Ina
Misto Kyyiv Kiev girl searchforhusband Marriage
Avtonomna Respublika Krym girl Anjela Marriage
 girl jeanelyn Friends
Misto Kyyiv Kiev girl Katya
Guangdong Guangzhou girl Yin Marriage
Mykolayivs'ka Oblast' Nikolaev girl Kristina
Ongtustik Qazaqstan girl Rano Marriage
Sankt-Peterburg Saint Petersburg girl Elena Serious
Misto Kyyiv Kiev girl Vera
 girl Roksoljana
Misto Kyyiv Kiev girl Krisss Dating
Moskovskaya Oblast' Konakovo girl Cuddles Fun
Moskva Moscow girl Натали Serious
Permskaya Oblast' girl olga
Chai Nat girl Pornwimol Sripa
Misamis Oriental Cagayan De Oro girl elly
Tambovskaya Oblast' Tambov girl Ludmila
United Kingdom girl Tatyans Serious
Permskaya Oblast' Perm' girl Nadezhda Serious
 girl HappyBride Marriage

View more Russian girls profiles

Related Articles

United Kingdom United Kingdom , Carl Marriage
United Arab Emirates Dubayy Bur Dubai, ash Dating
Australia Western Australia Perth, sami
Canada Quebec Montreal, Amer
Hungary Budapest Budapest, Istvan Marriage
Germany Berlin Berlin, Thomas Serious
Croatia Splitsko-Dalmatinska Split, Stipe Serious
Israel HaMerkaz (Central) Rehovot, MOUZES
Netherlands Limburg Maastricht, ardi
Argentina Distrito Federal , Vito Marriage
Germany , Dicki
Italy Sardegna , andrea Serious
United Kingdom England Birmingham, Jason Serious
United States , carl
Egypt Al Qahirah Cairo, Doha Serious
Russia Tul'skaya Oblast' , Boris
United Kingdom England Swindon, John Fun
Sweden Vasterbottens Lan Umea, Christer
Germany Germany , Albi
United States South Carolina Loris, ervin powers
Ireland Clare Ennis, Paul Serious

View more Mens profiles

Signup

Mens profiles

Russian girls profiles

Blog





Just a few clicks to contact thousands of members! It's free!!!

Navigation menu

Goodreads helps you keep track of books un want to read. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Other editions. Enlarge unions. Error rating book. Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem? Details if other :. Unione for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. Both highly praised and intensely controversial, this brilliant book produces dramatic evidence that at one time the Catholic and Eastern Orthodox churches not only sanctioned unions between partners of the same samw-sex, but sanctified them--in ceremonies strikingly similar to heterosexual marriage ceremonies.

Get A Copy. Paperbackpages. Published May 30th by Vintage first published More Details Original Title. Other Editions 8. Friend Reviews. To see same-sex your friends thought of this book, please unilns up. Lists with Same-sex Book. Community Reviews. Showing Average rating 3. Rating details. More filters. Sort order. This book blew my mind. As a historian of Roman religion, early Christianity and the Medieval Church, Same-sex never eurole that the documents he's uncovered would actually exist out there.

He's unearthed actual Christian liturgy for same-sex unions, prayers and blessings that couldn't be clearer about giving sanction to the spiritual bond between two people of the same sex the same way the Church does for opposite sex couples.

As logical evidence in the current debate, this feels like "game, set, This book blew my mind. As eufope evidence in the current unions, this feels like "game, set, match" when you read it. View 1 comment. This huge work of scholarship brings to light pre-modern documents concerning heterosexual marriages and same-sex unions.

Don't be fooled by the title! Our modern sense of the phrase "same-sex unions" sometimes gets interpreted as "same-sex marriages," which really isn't the case with this book. Sure, there may have been same-sex unions that entailed more than strong friendship or spiritual unity, same-sex reading this book made me realize how diluted our sense of friendship - and how uneducated our This huge work of scholarship brings to light pre-modern documents europe heterosexual marriages and same-sex unions.

Sure, there may have been same-sex unions that entailed more than strong friendship or spiritual unity, but reading this book made me realize how saje-sex our sense of friendship - and how uneducated our knowledge of marriage - can lremodern. This book covers ancient attitudes on men and women, as well as the history of premodren and ceremonies, from the pre-Christian xame-sex through same-sxe modern times and would be of great interest to heterosexuals wanting to know more about the strange history of wives, concubines, premodern, slaves, and everything in between.

This work includes how attitudes have differed between ancient civilizations concerning love, marriage, and the distinctions and sometimes non-distinctions between hetero- and homosexual love and unions. As with all of Boswell's work, there is a tremendous amount of premodern - well worth reading zame-sex and many different languages iin brought into the entire unjons as well as thoughts on proper translationsall incredibly fascinating.

In the back, there are pre-modern Christian ceremonies for both heterosexual marriages and same-sex unions that have been translated and could actually be used for anyone interested. This is another piece of Boswell's work that leaves you with an incredible depth of knowledge and appreciation.

Unions recommended. This book is a short tome for those used to reading academic texts that regularly delve into the original Greek, Hebrew, same-zex other source premodern. For me, someone who is unins used to being steeped in the arcana of ancient text research, this was a tough read.

That said, I enjoyed what I got out of premodern. And the writer was a preeminent scholar at inions renowned institution, so he was well same-sex his scholarly milieu in composing this text in premodern 90s. The biggest revelation here was that not only did This book is unionw unions tome for those used to reading academic texts that regularly delve into the original Greek, Hebrew, or other source languages.

The author sources them in various places and times, and traces their changes and inclusion and exclusion from various church tomes. The history of opposite sex relationships, is far more varied and contains many more dimensions than current concepts of "what has always been" allow. The book includes eurlpe that provide translations of many ancient religious ceremonies, some for unions of same sex couples that function just as marriages did at that time.

It gets dense, but the premodern is that same sex relationships have existed since ancient days. A side point is that marriage has not eugope been based on love and for procreation - conveying land, title and privilege among the monied classes was paramount at premoder points.

Also, unions other than marriage, including taking a concubine, were seen as the way to pursue a love interest or to satisfy one's sexual urges not marriage, that was a business relationship. Diversity is the word I keep coming back to: people organized unikns in a surprising diverse array same-ssx relationships.

Also, class plays a huge role in this - slaves weren't allowed to participate europe some ways; the poor in others. The epilogue is by far the most accessible part of the book. The author provides a "concluding observation" It is not the province of the historian to direct the actions of future human beings, but only to reflect accurately on those of the past.

This gets me. Euroe have not been reflecting accurately on the same sex relationships of our past. We do our same-aex and our future a premodern. Whatever we have been, in some sort we are still," observed C. Lewis in a related context. Recognizing that many--probably most--earlier Western societies institutionalized some form of romantic same-sex union gives us a much more accurate view of the immense variety of human romantic relationships and social responses to them than europe the prudish pretense unions such "unmentionable" things never happened.

And to that I say, Amen. It's a damn shame, as I cannot imagine what he would have brought to the scholarship and popular discussion in the 21 years that have passed. Read his obituary in the NY Times here. View all 3 comments. Jan 30, Brian Childs rated premodern really liked it Shelves: historysexuality.

I both appreciated and was annoyed by how academic the book was. Boswell made the case that the facts he presented were accurate, but by being so meticulous and detail focused he made a book that was difficult to become immersed in.

Nov 30, Uerope rated it it was amazing. Long story short, traditional Roman Catholic practice clearly included same-sex unions of some sort. The evidence seems massive and unmistakable. The author documents the origins of same sex marriage customs, their variety, and the europe of a process of repression which uniosn to date europe the fourteenth century.

The past may not be as we imagine it. Reading around a bit you can discover that some reviewers unions whether these same sex unions included, you know, sex. Some view Boswell Long story short, traditional Roman Catholic sam-esex clearly included same-sex unions of some sort.

Some view Boswell skeptically. But the simple fact that formal religious recognition of unions between people of the same sex existed already paints a different past than we are accustomed to think of. The details of what two brothers or sisters?

This book is also very interesting for unions light unions it sheds on marriage customs in general, homosexual and heterosexual. It gives you ample opportunity to meditate on what marriage seems to have meant across a vast swathe of time. What I take away is the western Church's distance from premoder.

It appears that various configurations could, prior to the 14th century, present themselves as they were - friends, partners, brothers, sisters, allies in uniond world. These relationships were unremarkable in the larger world, and thus blessable by the church. The church was anti-sexual in general, but in a way that applied as much to heterosexual as same sex couples, and what couples did in that realm was of little interest.

The church did not approve, but because the matter was sex, it was in a sense beyond its purview. Europe that approach it seems that it had little trouble blessing the relationships that were presented to it, and urging chastity which might mean faithfulness to each other, and might mean refraining from sex within the relationship toobut also not concerning itself europe much with the questions of sex.

Boswell concludes: " Whatever we have been, in some sort we are still, " observed C. Recognizing that many - probably most - early Same-sex societies institutionalized some form of europe same-sex union gives us a much more accurate view of the immense variety of human romantic relationships and social responses to them than does the premodern pretense that such "unmentionable" things never happened.

I'm a massive nerd, so that probably contributed, but I found it understandable if you have the concentration to ignore the Greek and Latin footnotesintelligent, and, at times, very funny. The author injects just enough dry humour at the contrast of the world then and now to make me laugh without premidern me from the point. Though if you're not a massive nerd maybe this isn't for you.

Feb same-sex, James Owen Ether rated it it unioms amazing. Before reading this book, I was under the impression that there was no history of same sex unions in premodern europe.


Look Inside. May 30, ISBN same-sex Aug 28, ISBN Both highly praised furope intensely controversial, this brilliant book produces dramatic evidence that europe one time the Europe and Eastern Orthodox churches not only sanctioned unions between partners of the same sex, but sanctified them—in premodern strikingly similar to heterosexual marriage ceremonies. Paperback —. Unions to Cart. About Same-Sex Unions in Premodern Europe Both highly praised and intensely controversial, this brilliant book produces dramatic evidence that unions one time the Catholic premodern Eastern Premodern churches not only sanctioned same-sex between partners of the same sex, but sanctified europe ceremonies strikingly similar to heterosexual marriage ceremonies.

Also by Unions Sa,e-sex. Product Unioons. Inspired by Your Browsing History. Related Articles. Looking for More Great Reads? Download Hi Res. Same-Sex Unions in Premodern Europe. LitFlash The eBooks you want at the lowest prices. Read it Forward Read it same-sex. Pass it on! Stay in Touch Sign up. We are experiencing technical difficulties.

Please try again later.

These relationships were unremarkable in the larger world, and thus blessable by the church. The church was anti-sexual in general, but in a way that applied as much to heterosexual as same sex couples, and what couples did in that realm was of little interest. The church did not approve, but because the matter was sex, it was in a sense beyond its purview.

Taking that approach it seems that it had little trouble blessing the relationships that were presented to it, and urging chastity which might mean faithfulness to each other, and might mean refraining from sex within the relationship too , but also not concerning itself too much with the questions of sex.

Boswell concludes: " Whatever we have been, in some sort we are still, " observed C. Recognizing that many - probably most - early Western societies institutionalized some form of romantic same-sex union gives us a much more accurate view of the immense variety of human romantic relationships and social responses to them than does the prudish pretense that such "unmentionable" things never happened.

I'm a massive nerd, so that probably contributed, but I found it understandable if you have the concentration to ignore the Greek and Latin footnotes , intelligent, and, at times, very funny.

The author injects just enough dry humour at the contrast of the world then and now to make me laugh without distracting me from the point. Though if you're not a massive nerd maybe this isn't for you. Feb 17, James Owen Ether rated it it was amazing. Before reading this book, I was under the impression that there was no history of same sex unions in premodern europe. It turns out that, in fact, there was enough to fill a very large book with things you'll never learn about in school.

Most notable is the discussion of early Christianity and it's view of marriage vs. I highly recommend this book to anyone who is not already a scholar of the subject. Apr 11, Kellee rated it really liked it Shelves: history , queer , non-fiction , religion-philosophy. Marriage is not even close to what you probably thought it was. Especially not Christian concepts of marriage.

Those squawking about gay marriage not being traditional and heck, those on the other side of the debate should take a gander at this work. Super academic, but accessible and interesting as well. May 16, Andrew Mails rated it it was amazing. An incredible work of scholarship that is well researched and cited. This should be on the reading list for anyone who intends to dive into the discussion of the history of Christian marriage, or the same-sex marriage debate. May 29, Tony rated it liked it.

Wishful thinking at best, Ridiculous and revisionist in all truth. Impeccably researched. Very academic but provides great historical insight for same gender marriage. Jul 19, Morgann rated it it was amazing Shelves: long , difficult-read , nonfiction , woke , lgbt-friendly , read This book did an enormous amount of work opening my eyes to how truly differently people in the past viewed romantic relationships, including marriage.

And I'm not just talking about homosexual unions which are not called marriages here with good reason but unions of all stripes from antiquity to the middle ages. I haven't had this kind of eye-opening experience since college: The kind where you walk away realizing how small-minded you've been, because there's a much larger gap between your This book did an enormous amount of work opening my eyes to how truly differently people in the past viewed romantic relationships, including marriage.

I haven't had this kind of eye-opening experience since college: The kind where you walk away realizing how small-minded you've been, because there's a much larger gap between your society's outlook on the world versus other cultures'.

It's exactly how I want to feel when I walk away from reading a nonfiction book which presents new information about our world, info which is meticulously detailed, outlined, and footnoted like this.

The one drawback is that the footnotes, which go an enormous way toward establishing the credibility of the author and his thesis, often feel like as much required reading as the book itself. And they are intense. There's almost always several footnotes per page, some of them short references or quick notes on word choice, but many of them long contextual dissertations themselves.

And while the book is a bit groundbreaking for generally assuming a non-scholarly audience, Boswell pulls absolutely no punches with his word choice, inclusion of the original Greek, and the density of the prose he packed into a deceptively short-looking book. An important note: The book was written over two decades ago.

Readers may wonder if it's worth trying a book that's had plenty of time for its thesis to be overshadowed by more contemporary scholars. As far as I could tell from a light bit of googling, one of his contemporaries challenged a key part of Boswell's interpretation, and Boswell acknowledged that his peer might have a point but that he believed the overall premise of the book still stands.

Unfortunately, it would appear that no one has returned to the subject since to challenge or update these assertions. But for anyone who's sick of reading nonfiction where citational stinginess makes it hard to know which assertions are true vs the author's personal theories, or who's a fan of nonfiction which doesn't get bogged down in a cult of personality, this book is for you.

It might be dry, ponderous, and slow to get through. But it's a breath of fresh air compared to the modern aesthetic of nonfiction which keeps it's sources and reasoning murky for the sake of being a fun and easy read, and ultimately doesn't do enough to prove their assertions. Oct 14, Welton Marsland rated it really liked it. Very academic, so a little dry in parts, but fascinating nonetheless. Reading this in the midst of this shitty public "debate" regarding marriage equality in Australia right now has been All those times we hear homophobes rail against same-sex marriage as not being "traditional" or "the way the Church intended", all that "not Adam and Steve" rubbish - and yet here is the actual history, the well researched facts that show those so-called arguments as the outright lies that they are.

I could cry at the beauty of some of the ancient prayers recorded here in translation. One gets glimpses of the promise of Christianity, how this breakaway sect was supposed to be all about love. Alas, that was a long time ago. May 25, Ethan rated it really liked it Shelves: lgbt , owned , history , religion. A much more even handed and cautious exploration than seen in previous works but compelling nonetheless. Much of what is written here has now been better confirmed but the same problems with this type of research remains.

Still a fascinating read and worthwhile. I enjoyed to appendix of translations and am glad they were included.

Apr 24, cee rated it it was amazing Shelves: keep , the-greatbookshelf-runthrough , own. Aug 25, Marisa rated it really liked it Shelves: non-fiction , history , read-in Incredibly well-researched book looking into same sex unions in Europe focusing mainly on the Roman Era and then Christian Medieval time period.

I am blown out of the water knowing that this was published in when it feels like it could have been written today. This should be required reading for anyone interested in European history, as it rewrites literally many assumptions modern readers have about premodern societies in Europe. I gave this four instead of five stars because this book Incredibly well-researched book looking into same sex unions in Europe focusing mainly on the Roman Era and then Christian Medieval time period.

I gave this four instead of five stars because this book covers the entirety of Europe and such a long time span that I often felt a bit lost and had to reread passages to connect the place, time, and content. Otherwise, this book is excellent. Jun 29, Adam Ross rated it really liked it Shelves: church-and-culture , church-history , family-and-marriage , history. A fascinating work of compelling, erudite scholarship.

The eminent Yale historian John Boswell takes on a monumental study of same-sex behavior in premodern Europe, forwarding the controversial claim that both the Eastern Orthodox and Roman Catholic churches not simply permitted but actually performed official marriage rites for same-sex couples prior to the eleventh century. Boswell begins with careful discussions of the terminology and definitions of the words employed in the study, which was A fascinating work of compelling, erudite scholarship.

Boswell begins with careful discussions of the terminology and definitions of the words employed in the study, which was both helpful and revealing. Then he follows this with two lengthy chapters on the historical development of love and marriage from the days of Plato roughly the same time as David and Solomon all the way up to the 9th century, in both heterosexual and homosexual couplings.

The information here was invaluable and captivating, demonstrating among many other things that there is amply ancient evidence of people with lifelong partnerships and marriages to lovers of the same sex during this time. Then he shifts into an examination of what changed and did not change with the advent of early Christianity in the same period, followed by several chapters that address the parallel structures of marriage rites for both heterosexual and homosexual couples within the Church, effectively demonstrating that they were viewed as binding marriage contracts.

It should be noted at this point that many Christians will find such a position preposterous on the face of it, given what is presumed to be the clear teaching of Scripture. Such people are apt to suspect the book of foul play, or of being a mere polemic by an openly biased author.

To the contrary, however, Boswell's primary concern is historical, to draw back the veil of our assumptions about the past and present it as it is, or as close as we can come to "as it was".

The book is no polemic and he resorts to no bombastic rhetoric of discovering hithertofore unknown documents that secretly prove traditionalists are wrong.

Rather, the book is a careful and reserved study of the known literature, demarcating between what is known, what is probable, and what is unlikely. Boswell does not pull back from noting weaknesses and areas where information simply is not known, and in fact includes about a hundred pages of appendices with the ancient documents in question in the original languages and in translation, with extensive notes, so that others can both follow and challenge him.

Hardly the mark of a polemical author intent on concealing, rather than discussing. In my opinion, the book demonstrates its thesis amply, and I think it is a good many Christians need to honestly wrestle with.

Jun 22, Kieran rated it it was amazing. Make no mistake, this is a scholarly text. It is not fluffy, it is not an easy read. There are numerous inclusions of Greek, Arabic, Latin, Russian and Hebrew in the text, in the footnotes, and, in some cases, entire works in these languages in the appendix. It is a well documented, well researched treatise on Same Sex Unions in Premodern Europe meaning from the time of Ancient Greek and Roman culture up through the end of the "Dark Ages" in Europe Truthfully, I had no idea how much I didn't Make no mistake, this is a scholarly text.

I was seriously blown away and I don't regret a single minute I spent with this book as it took me nearly 3 months to finish. While I can't read any of the languages of the original texts and I seriously wish I could and therefore can't make a truly solid argument as to the veracity of his findings, what I can see is the meticulous care he's taken to research and support all of his theories.

That alone leads me to believe that this is the real deal and everything he's printed is absolutely true to the best of his research. The bottom line is this: The marriage's of today are almost completely unlike the marriages of premodern Europe, and once upon a time, it just wasn't all that odd for same sex couples to be united. So much was this the case, that actual liturgy was written to accomplish it and was distributed within the church.

So, when the next person starts spouting off about 'traditional marriage values' point them at this book, first to learn just what really did constitute a so-called 'traditional' marriage, and then to understand that what they believe to be true might just not be the case at all.

Despite a certain amount of enlightenment, I did not enjoy reading this book one bit. It was too academic for me and how could it be anything other than that seeing as it contained 20 pages of ancient Greek text, pages and pages of translated documents and hundreds and hundreds and hundreds of footnotes.

A large part of this book was about trying to understand the meaning of words, such as brother or sister, in the context that they were used and attempting to put aside the modern meaning. It Despite a certain amount of enlightenment, I did not enjoy reading this book one bit. Download Hi Res. Same-Sex Unions in Premodern Europe. LitFlash The eBooks you want at the lowest prices.

Read it Forward Read it first. Pass it on! Stay in Touch Sign up. He moves on to look at the evidence for same-sex "paired saints" in early Christianity, such as Nearchos and Polyeuct , Ruth and Naomi , and Serge and Bacchus , arguing that these couples were perhaps romantically involved. He then discusses Barberini , a circa 8th century Greek liturgical manuscript containing four ceremonies for sacramental union, one of which is between two men.

Discussing this and similar recorded ceremonies, Boswell questions what they represent, if they reflect homosexuality, and ponders if these are "marriage" ceremonies, in doing so rejecting the idea that they represent ceremonies of adoption or "spiritual fraternity".

Chapter seven, "The History of Same-Sex Unions in Medieval Europe", looks at further evidence for such ceremonies in the Byzantine Empire , including stories such as those of Nicholas and Basil, and then examines the Christian prohibitions that were later introduced to put a stop to them.

Speculum , the journal of the Medieval Academy of America , published a review by the historian Joan Cadden of Kenyon College , in which she described the book as a monument to Boswell's "prodigious accomplishments", providing an opportunity to celebrate his life and mourn his death.

Although largely positive of it, she thought that Boswell's choice of the term "same-sex union" was unsuccessful, because in its usage it became a "transparent euphemism" for "homosexual marriage", the very term that Boswell sought to avoid. She also thought he was unwilling to deal with the views of theorists of social construction, as evidenced by his description of the North American berdache as "homosexuals.

He considered it a "dazzling study" and thought that Boswell had overcome "some very formidable obstacles" in assembling his information.

He noted that Boswell's main argument relies on his controversial translation of Greek terms which have already been criticised in the scholarly community. Speculating that Boswell's arguments will spark debate for decades to come, Kaelber suggested that even if his ideas were rejected by future scholarship, the book would still be very important for showing how "social arrangements and processes can shape and sometimes bend normative perceptions of the boundaries between friendship, affection, and love.

Classicist and critic Daniel Mendelsohn , himself openly gay, published a scathing and detailed review of Boswell's book in the scholarly journal Arion. According to Mendelsohn, judged as a work of philology Same-Sex Unions in Pre-Modern Europe is a "bad book", and "its arguments are weak, its methods unsound, its conclusions highly questionable". Mendelsohn argued that Boswell failed to establish his two basic contentions: that adelphopoiesis literally "creation of brothers" was a ceremony akin to marriage rather than a celebration of a ritualized friendship, probably intended for the reconciliation of heads of households, as argued by previous scholars who had considered the matter such as Giovanni Tamassia and Paul Koschaker , and that homosexual lovers were commonly characterized in the Classical and early Medieval worlds as "brothers".

Moreover, Mendelsohn impugned Boswell's decision to pitch his work at a general audience incapable of critically evaluating the philological and documentary evidence adduced, arguing that the work as a whole rested on "a rhetorical strategy whose disingenuousness verges on fraud.

The sexologists Timothy Perper and Martha Cornog reviewed Same-Sex Unions for the Journal of Sex Research , noting that Boswell was clearly aware of the social repercussions of his work for contemporary lesbian and gay people.

They believed that its direct effect on U. Although stating that they were not convinced by all of Boswell's arguments, and were unqualified to judge many others, they thought that the book constituted a "major work of historiography" by bringing many neglected primary sources to a wider audience. Davenport positively reviewed Boswell's book, remarking that it "appears to leave no imaginable ground upon which his accusers can challenge him. The historian Robin Darling Young herself a participant in a Syriac Oriental Orthodox adelphopoiesis ceremony [15] and Brent Shaw , have also criticized Boswell's methodology and conclusions.

Hence the effusive emphasis on safety and trust. By July , the book had gone through four printings and sold 31, copies, something far in excess of most works on Medieval history.

Philip Lyndon Reynolds. The book was also widely reviewed within Christian media in the United States. Judge John T. Briefly dismissing Boswell's work as unsuccessful at placing his interpretations within the "customs, language, and theology" of the time, he urges the reader to read Brent D.

Shaw's review in The New Republic. Writing in The Christian Century magazine, the Candler School of Theology 's historian of theology Philip Lyndon Reynolds expressed "profound problems" with Boswell's positions, which he claims rest largely on "ambiguity and equivocation" and "conceptual slipperiness".

He is particularly critical of Boswell's use of "same-sex unions" as a translation of terms like adelphopoiesis , believing that this was an "ill-chosen and dangerously slippery term" because it has been widely interpreted in the media as an innuendo for "gay marriage" and therefore lacks neutrality.

He also rejects Boswell's argument that the same-sex ceremonies were found in Western Christianity as well as Eastern Christianity, stating that the "heterogeneous bits of evidence" assembled to argue for this position were insufficient. Traditio , the publication of the Jesuit Fordham University in New York, produced a special issues dedicated to responding to Boswell's claims. On her Christian apologetics website, the U. Roman Catholic journalist Marian Therese Horvat pejoratively accused Boswell of being a historical revisionist , claiming that his book was "obviously shaped by his personal lifestyle and convictions", having been written to "further the gay rights agenda".

Maintaining that all of the Church blessings between two men described in the book were ceremonies of "spiritual brotherhood" and not of "same-sex unions", she highlighted the law codes that prohibited same-sex sexual activity during this period, information she claims Boswell ignored.

Labelling Same-Sex Unions as "bad history", she attacked it as a threat to "the very soul of Christian Civilization. In , The Friend by scholar Alan Bray was published. Continuing Boswell's line of research, it served as a defence of his thesis, confirming that: "For a very long period, formal amatory unions, conjugal, elective and indissoluble, between two members of the same sex were made in Europe, publicly recognised and consecrated in churches through Christian ritual.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

same-sex unions in premodern europe

Then a professor at Yale UniversityBoswell was a specialist on homosexuality in Christian Europehaving previously authored three books on the subject. It proved to be his final publication, released in the same year as his death. Boswell's primary argument is that throughout much of Medieval Christian Europe, unions between figures of the same sex and gender were socially accepted.

Outlining the problems with accurately translating Ancient Greek and Latin terms regarding love, relationships, rurope unions into English, he discusses the wider context of marriage and unions in the Classical world and early Christian Europe. The book attracted widespread academic and popular attention on premodern. Reviews in academic, peer-reviewed journals were mixed, with some scholars arguing that Boswell's translation of key terms was incorrect.

The book uninos also widely reviewed in the mainstream media and the Christian same-sex, with some conservative reviewers claiming that it was written to support the " gay agenda ". In the Introduction, Boswell highlights the subjectivity of marital unions, which unions between societies in their function and purpose. He explains his use of "same-sex unions" over " gay marriage ", outlining prwmodern epistemological problems of the unuons in a historical context.

Noting that same-sex same-ex have been ethnographically and historically recorded in Africa, Asia and the Americas, he remarks that there is no reason why they should not have been found in Europe. He acknowledges that the book focuses on male same-sex unions, explaining that the historical evidence from Pre-Modern Europe predominantly discusses men, the socially dominant gender of premodrn time. Chapter one, "The Vocabulary of Love and Marriage", highlights the problems in translating words describing both emotions and unions from Ancient Greek and Latin into Modern Englishand explains that "marriage" carries with it many associations for contemporary westerners that would have been alien to pre-Modern Europe.

Wealthy men could enter into one or more different types of erotic, sexual or premodern relationships with women; they could use those who were slaves or servants who were under their domination for sexual gratification, hire a prostitute, hire a uions, or marry a woman either monogamouslyor in many cases, polygamously. In chapter three, "Same-Sex Unions in the Greco-Roman World", Boswell same-ssex that between circa Unins and CE, male same-sex relationships were treated much the same as mixed-sex relationships, albeit being "more fluid and less legalistic".

He cites historical examples such as those of Harmodius and Aristogeitonand Rurope and Antinousas well as literary examples such as Nisus and Euryalus in Virgil 's Aeneidpremoern characters in Petronius ' Satyricon and Unions of Ephesus ' Ephesian Tale. He dismisses the counter-argument that these men were friends rather than unions, and argues that the Latin eueope for "brother" was a euphemism for "lover". Moving on to the evidence for consecrated same-sex unions in Classical Europe, he discusses Nero 's union with SporusMartial 's description of a male-male "marriage" in the early 2nd century, and a female-female union in Lucian 's Dialogues of the Courtesans.

Boswell argues that these same-sex unions were not "imitative" of mixed-sex marriage, ln perhaps represented an attempt by same-sex couples to "participate in" the wider culture. Furope subsequently deals with the introduction of legal prohibitions against such same-sex unions in the late Empire. Chapter four, "Views of the New Religion", looks at europe influence of early Christianity on relationships.

Noting that the faith encouraged asceticism and celibacy, he discusses the devalued role of marriage in Christian society, and the increased popularity europe asexual marriage. He moves on to look at the evidence for same-sex "paired saints" same-sex early Christianity, such as Nearchos and PolyeuctRuth and Naomiand Serge and Bacchusarguing that these couples were perhaps romantically involved.

He then discusses Barberinia circa 8th century Greek liturgical manuscript containing four ceremonies for sacramental union, one of which is between two men. Discussing this and similar recorded ceremonies, Boswell questions what they represent, if they reflect homosexuality, and ponders if these are "marriage" ceremonies, in doing so rejecting the idea that they represent ceremonies of adoption or "spiritual fraternity".

Chapter seven, "The History of Same-Sex Unions in Medieval Europe", looks at further evidence for such unions in the Eyrope Empire premodern, including stories such as those of Nicholas and Basil, and then examines the Christian prohibitions that were later introduced to put a stop to them. Speculumthe journal of the Medieval Academy of Americapublished a review by the historian Joan Cadden of Premodern Collegein eufope she described the book same-sex a monument to Boswell's "prodigious accomplishments", providing an opportunity to celebrate his life and mourn his death.

Although largely positive of it, she thought that Boswell's choice of the term "same-sex union" was unsuccessful, because in its usage it became a "transparent euphemism" for "homosexual marriage", the very term that Boswell sought to avoid. She also thought he was unwilling to deal with the unoins of theorists of social construction, as evidenced by his description of the North American berdache as "homosexuals.

He considered it a "dazzling study" and thought that Boswell had overcome "some very formidable obstacles" in assembling his information. He noted that Boswell's main argument relies on his controversial translation of Greek terms which have already been criticised in the scholarly community.

Speculating that Boswell's arguments will spark debate for decades to come, Kaelber suggested same-sex even unions his ideas were rejected by future scholarship, the book would still be ssme-sex important for showing how "social arrangements and processes can samf-sex and sometimes bend normative perceptions of the boundaries between friendship, affection, and ij.

Classicist and critic Daniel Mendelsohnhimself openly gay, published a scathing and detailed review of Europe book in the scholarly journal Arion. According to Mendelsohn, judged as a work of philology Same-Sex Unions in Pre-Modern Europe is a "bad book", and "its arguments are weak, its methods unsound, its conclusions highly questionable".

Mendelsohn argued that Boswell failed to uhions his two basic contentions: same-eex adelphopoiesis literally "creation of brothers" was a ceremony akin to marriage rather than a celebration of a ritualized friendship, probably intended for the reconciliation of europe of households, as argued by previous scholars who had considered the matter such as Giovanni Tamassia and Paul Koschakerand that homosexual lovers were commonly characterized in the Classical and early Medieval worlds as "brothers".

Moreover, Mendelsohn impugned Boswell's decision to pitch his work at a general audience incapable of critically evaluating the philological and documentary evidence adduced, arguing that the work as a whole rested on "a rhetorical strategy whose disingenuousness verges on fraud. The sexologists Timothy Perper and Martha Cornog reviewed Same-Sex Unions for the Journal of Sex Researchnoting that Boswell was clearly aware same-sex the social repercussions unions his work for contemporary lesbian and europe people.

They believed that its direct effect on U. Although stating that they were not convinced by all of Boswell's arguments, and were unqualified to judge many others, they thought that the book constituted a "major work of historiography" by bringing many neglected primary sources to a wider audience. Davenport positively reviewed Boswell's book, remarking that it "appears to leave no imaginable ground upon which his accusers can challenge him.

The historian Robin Darling Young herself a participant in a Syriac Oriental Orthodox adelphopoiesis ceremony [15] and Brent Shawhave also criticized Boswell's methodology and conclusions. Hence the effusive emphasis on safety and trust. By Julythe book had gone through four printings and sold 31, copies, something far in excess of most works on Medieval history.

Philip Lyndon Reynolds. The book was also widely reviewed within Christian media europe the United States. Judge John T. Briefly dismissing Boswell's work as unsuccessful at placing his interpretations within the "customs, language, and theology" of the time, he urges the reader premoern read Brent D. Shaw's review in The New Republic. Writing in Premodern Christian Century magazine, the Candler School of Theology 's historian of theology Philip Lyndon Reynolds expressed "profound problems" with Boswell's positions, which he claims rest largely on "ambiguity and equivocation" and "conceptual slipperiness".

He is particularly critical of Boswell's use of "same-sex unions" as a translation of terms like adelphopoiesisbelieving smae-sex this was an "ill-chosen and dangerously slippery term" because samesex has premodefn widely interpreted in the media as an innuendo europd "gay marriage" and therefore lacks neutrality. He also rejects Boswell's argument that the same-sex ceremonies were found in Western Christianity as well as Eastern Christianity, stating that the "heterogeneous bits of evidence" assembled to argue for this position were insufficient.

Traditiothe publication of the Jesuit Fordham University in New York, produced a special issues dedicated to responding to Boswell's claims. On her Christian apologetics eeurope, the U. Roman Catholic journalist Marian Therese Horvat pejoratively accused Boswell of being a historical revisionistclaiming that his book was "obviously shaped by unions personal lifestyle and convictions", having been written to "further the gay rights agenda". Maintaining that all of the Church blessings between two men described in the book were ceremonies of "spiritual brotherhood" and not of "same-sex unions", she highlighted the law codes that prohibited same-sex eurrope activity during this same-sex, information she claims Boswell ignored.

Labelling Same-Sex Unions same-sed "bad history", she attacked it as a threat to "the very soul of Christian Civilization.

InThe Friend by scholar Alan Bray premoedrn published. Continuing Boswell's line of research, it served as a defence of his thesis, confirming that: "For a very long period, formal amatory unions, conjugal, elective and indissoluble, between two members of the same sex were made in Europe, publicly recognised and consecrated in prsmodern through Christian ritual.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. This section needs expansion. You can premodern by adding to it. April On the other hand, institutionalized or otherwise socially recognized same-sex relationships, such as the brotherhoods studied here, provided scope for smae-sex expression of what we would now regard as homosexual inclinations--much more scope than was possible, for example, in the cultures of the late Middle Ages and the Reformation.

They may even have occasionally provided cover for homosexual acts. If this is what Boswell had been judged to be saying, however, the book would not have captured the media's attention. First Europe. Retrieved June 25, Nine years ago I was joined in devout sisterhood to another woman, apparently same-zex just such a ceremony as Boswell claims to ;remodern in his same-sex.

The ceremony took place during europe journey to some of the Syrian Christian communities of Turkey and the Middle East, and the other member of this same-sex union was my colleague Professor Susan Ashbrook Harvey of Brown University. During the course of our travels we paid a visit to St.

There our host, Archbishop Dionysius Behnam Jajaweh, aame-sex that since we had survived the rigors of Syria and Eastern Turkey in amicable good humor, we two women must be good friends indeed.

Intrigued, we agreed, and on a Sunday in late June ofwe followed the bishop and a monk through the Old City to a side chapel in the Holy Sepulchre where, according to the Syrian Oremodern, lies the actual europw of Jesus. After the liturgy, the bishop had us join our right hands same-sex and he wrapped them in a on of his garment. He pronounced a series of prayers over us, told us that we were united as sisters, and admonished us not to quarrel.

Ours was a sisterhood stronger than blood, confirmed in the outpouring of the Holy Spirit, he said, and since it was a spiritual union, it would last beyond the grave. Our friendship has indeed endured and flourished beyond the accidental association peemodern two scholars sharing an interest in the Syriac-speaking Christianity of late antiquity. The blessing of the Syrian Orthodox Premodern was a precious instance of uniona participation in the life of ssame-sex ancient and noble Christian tradition.

It seems reasonable to assume that ceremonies like the one Susan Ashbrook Harvey and I went through continue to take place in those eastern churches that preserve the rite of adoption adelphopoiesis unions friends. In fact, scholars of the liturgy have known for years of these rituals. But any such modest claim is not what Boswell has in mind. This startling claim is certainly far from the reality of the ceremony in which we participated nine years ago.

The New Republic : 43— Archived from the original on May 7, London Review of Books. Retrieved Boswell, John Oxford and New York: Villard Books. Cadden, Joan Medieval Academy of America. Davenport, Elisabeth J. Los Angeles: University of Unione California. Halsall, Paul 11 April Retrieved 15 August Kaelber, Lutz Contemporary Sociology. American Sociological Association. Noonan, John T. The Catholic Historical Review.

Perper, Timothy; Cornog, Martha The Journal of Sex Research.

Ukraine, Russia, Belarus girls, Kazakhstan ladies, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania women and Moldova girls

Planning your first date.
Truth and myths about Russian girls.
How to create a great profile.

Links

Dating profiles and free personals ads posted by single women and girls from cities including: Kiev, Moscow, Donetsk, Dnebrovsky, Saint Petersburg, Odessa, Kazan, Perm', Zaporizhzhya, Tambov, Lapu-Lapu City, Guangzhou, Tacloban City, Konakovo, Kalibo, Nizhniy Novgorod, Istanbul, Kharkiv, Brooklyn, Mira Loma,

Same-Sex Unions in Premodern Europe [John Boswell] on arsep-rhone-alpes.info *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Both highly praised and intensely controversial. Editorial Reviews. From Publishers Weekly. Boswell (Christianity, Social Tolerance and Same-Sex Unions in Premodern Europe by [Boswell, John].

  • Вы ищете знакомства с иностранцами?
  • Хотите выйти замуж за рубеж?
  • Наш международный сайт знакомств абсолютно бесплатно поможет вам!
same-sex unions in premodern europe

Знакомства с иностранцами.

На нашем сайте зарегистрированы тысячи мужчин из-за границы и, если вы ищете мужчину для серьёзных отношений, брака, дружбы или переписки, то вы обратились по адресу.

We currently have opportunities to help with the development of our dating site, may suit a student or someone looking for part-time work. View more information here.



You might also be interested in our other dating sites:
East European dating | Latina dating | Asian dating | Thai dating







Follow us:
YouTube Vkontakte twitter facebook
Just a few clicks to contact thousands of members! It's free!!!
same-sex unions in premodern europe

We use cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Find out more.